Monday, March 31, 2008

Saviksoah Demon



Story on PBS about Peary and the Eskimos and his effort to reach the North Pole...reminds me of Ishi's story...brb...







quote







Ishi (c. 1860March 25, 1916) was the name given to the last member of the Yahi, in turn the last surviving group of the Yana people of California. Ishi is believed to be the last Native American in Northern California to have lived the bulk of his life completely outside the European American culture. He emerged from the wild near Oroville, California, leaving his ancestral homeland in the foothills near Lassen Peak.
Ishi means man in the Yahi dialect of Yana; his real name was never known because it was taboo in Yahi society to say one's own name. Since he was the last member of his tribe, his real name died with him.







http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ishi







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quote







In the 1980s, Kenn Harper wrote a book telling Minik's story, "Give Me My Father's Body." Convinced that the remains of Qisuk and the three other adult Inuit who died with him should be returned to Greenland, Harper once again tackled the resistance of the Museum of Natural History (which was reluctant to re-examine the case) and the red tape of two governments. In 1993, he succeeded, and stood before a new grave in Qaanaaq in northern Greenland and witnessed the ceremony denied to Minik nearly a century earlier. Along with Qisuk, the bodies of the three other Inuit from Minik's and Qisuk's group were repatriated as well.







http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minik_Wallace







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quote







After being noticed by townspeople, Ishi was taken into custody by a local sheriff for his own protection. He was then moved to the Museum of Anthropology at the University of California, San Francisco where he lived the remainder of his life in evident contentment, until his death from tuberculosis in 1916.







http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ishi







unquote







Museum specimens...brb...







quote







So for the fourth year in a row, Perry waited for the large ice sheets of frozen northern ocean to melt and break apart. Now on his fifth trip to Greenland, and once again with the steamer Hope, Perry went to Greenland with much to do. This time Peary had four hydraulic jacks capable of lifting 30 tons each. It is obvious Peary very much wanted the stone, but once again it would be very wrong to say the Peary went to Greenland for the meteorite, which is how it sounds in meteorite folklore. Peary even called the stone the "Saviksoah Demon", but perhaps this was because of the many times Peary, the meteorite and "he failed" appeared in print.







http://www.meteorite-times.com/Back_Links/2002/September/colectors_corner.htm

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quote

Ishi, whose life story was first described in the popular book Ishi in Two Worlds by Theodora Kroeber (1961, University of California Press), died of tuberculosis on March 25, 1916. Theodora Kroeber, the wife of Alfred Kroeber, notes in her book that Ishi's brain was removed during an autopsy, although she makes no mention of what happened to it.
The issue drew little notice until 1997, when four Maidu Indian tribes in northern California's Butte County formed a committee to campaign for the return of Ishi's remains for reburial in the Yahi homelands. They knew that his ashes were stored in a cemetery just south of San Francisco. Upon learning that his brain had ended up elsewhere, they launched an effort to find it.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/723008/posts

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quote

The Cape York meteorite, which collided with Earth nearly 10,000 years ago, is named for Cape York, the location of its discovery in Greenland, and is one of the largest iron meteorites in the world.







http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cape_York_meteorite







unquote

pic source

http://www.amnh.org/education/resources/rfl/web/meteoriteguide/images/capeyork_lg.jpg




Now on...Baby Boomers retiring...

quote

For almost a century, the Willamette Meteorite -- the largest meteor found in the U.S. and believed to have come from the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and brought to the museum from the Pacific Northwest in 1906 -- has been seen and touched by generations of awed schoolchildren and other fans of the cosmic mysteries.But as the $210 million Rose Center for Earth and Space opens at 81st Street near Central Park West to crowds that are expected to swell to 4.5 million visitors a year, the destiny of the dark, deeply gouged meteorite, seemingly secure on its steel pedestal in the planetarium's Cullman Hall of the Universe, has been cast into doubt.Acting under a federal law written for the preservation and repatriation of Native American cultural and religious artifacts (NAGPRA), an Indian group in Oregon has submitted a claim for the meteorite, saying it is a holy tribal object that brought messages from the spirit world long before the arrival of white men.

http://www.turtletrack.org/Issues00/Co02262000/CO_02262000_Meteorite.htm

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quote

Even in the monotheistic religions of Judaeo-Christian tradition we find traces of an ancient meteorite cult. In the Hebrew language, meteorites were called "betyls", an equivalent to the Greek "baitylia", meaning "the residence of God". In the Bible, we find a story where Jacob, the ancestor of the Israelites, beds his head on such a betyl-stone in the desert. In his sleep, he has an impressive vision of a stairway to heaven leading directly to the throne of God. The story says that Jacob was full of awe when he awoke, and that he built a temple around that stone. However, nothing of this temple has been preserved up to this day.

http://www.meteorite.fr/en/basics/history.htm

unquote

DavidDavid

Sunday, March 30, 2008

Starfish Prime


Clooney in a shoot m up...I think it's a stolen bomb one...


Had to up my bid on ebay...it looks to be a good book...the one with the maps of the early Valley...and, another search turns it up on the web...so even if I dont get it...I've got it!...brb...




brb!...can't find it anywhere else...none of the used book dealers or Amazon...unusual!...I wont win unless everyone goes to sleep...
I had this thought today...that it's worth repeating that the "Neolithic" or "Golden" age isn't gone...it's what's called "wilderness"...and granted there's not much left of that!...but the world of the Dinosaurs isn't a "Lost World"...the self same wilderness they lived in we live in...
And now there's a lawsuit a foot (as if there weren't enough!) to save not just wilderness...but the whole planet from being gobbled up by microsopic black holes...brb...
quote
The builders of the world's biggest particle collider are being sued in federal court over fears that the experiment might create globe-gobbling black holes or never-before-seen strains of matter that would destroy the planet.
unquote
Odd thing is the atom smasher is in Europe and the lawsuit is here...on the news was the Texas case where the World Court tried to influence the case of foriegn fellow who was found guity of capital crimes...our court said that court has no jurisdiction in the US...some how Bush sided with the World Court...brb...
quote
The Supreme Court yesterday issued a broad ruling limiting presidential power and the reach of international treaties, saying neither President Bush nor the World Court has the authority to order a Texas court to reopen a death penalty case involving a foreign national.
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There were fears when the first A bomb was exploded that it would cause a chain reaction in the atmoshphere..brb...
quote
Teller also raised the speculative possibility that an atomic bomb might "ignite" the atmosphere, because of a hypothetical fusion reaction of nitrogen nuclei. Bethe calculated, according to Serber, that it could not happen. In his book The Road from Los Alamos, Bethe says a refutation was written by Konopinski, C. Marvin, and Teller as report LA-602, showing that ignition of the atmosphere was impossible, not just unlikely.[6] In Serber's account, Oppenheimer mentioned it to Arthur Compton, who "didn't have enough sense to shut up about it. It somehow got into a document that went to Washington" which led to the question being "never laid to rest".[7
unquote
Well...in fact a test in the high atmosphere is suspected of screwing with things..brb...
sheessh...this I didn't know...there were many tests high up...right up to jfk...and the test ban...
quote
The Soviets detonated four high-altitude tests in 1961 and three in 1962. During the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962, both the US and the USSR detonated several high-altitude nuclear explosions as a form of saber-rattling.
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And it's curious...the high explosions could destroy incoming missles...and satellites...so there's always been a kinda use once and hope defense if the wrong button is pushed!...sigh...but what I was thinking about was a test that effected the van allen belts...brb...
quote
In the 1961 movie Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, the Van Allen radiation belt catches fire, threatening Earth.
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That movies been replayed a lot lately!...
Clooney running atop cars in NY...trying to catch the bomb thief...brb...
quote
In 1963, Brown et al. reported in the Journal of Geophysical Research that Starfish Prime had created a belt of MeV electrons, and Bill Hess reported in 1968 that some Starfish electrons remained for five years. Others reported that radioactive particles from Starfish Prime descended to earth seasonally and accumulated in terrestrial organisms such as fungi and lichens.
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Well..lemesee if I can hook that one up with global warming...brb..
here's a page that I see here and there..the threat of emp...
but that's not global warming!...brb...
quote from a blog comment!...
Adam Rogers Says: August 10th, 2006 at 2:56 pm
I interviewed Van Allen years ago for a story on one of his proteges, the NASA global warming scientist James Hansen - the guy who says the Bush Administration has tried to get him to clam up about climate trouble. Van Allen was cool, smart, and nice until I asked my last question, about the 1960s movie “Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea,” in which an experimental submarine attempts to save the Earth after the Van Allen radiation belts catch fire.
No, seriously. That was what it was about.
Anyway, Van Allen’s tone changed. Not sure I recall the quote exactly, but it was something along the lines of, “that was the stupidest thing I have ever seen.”
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It was an obit on Allen page...
anyway...the thought is across I think!...that tinkering with things and not knowing for certain what can happen...is a little maddening..!!
Oh...shes digging at the wires with a knife..."I need your gun..." "Easy Easy."..countdown......voom!..."Are you okay!"...violins and horns play....
Here's the "Paul Revere" of global warming...
quote
''It became quite clear this summer,'' Dr. Hansen said, ''that what we had been predicting is just what's happening.'' By Way of Venus
A scientific report on the data supporting his statements will be published soon in the Journal of Geophysical Research.
Dr. Hansen came to the study of the earth's atmosphere by way of Venus. After earning a Ph.D. in physics at the University of Iowa, where he worked under Dr. James A. Van Allen, who discovered the radiation belts encircling earth, Dr. Hansen joined the Goddard Institute, which is operated as a research center by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. One of his major projects was the spacecraft study of Venusian atmosphere, where a rampant greenhouse effect has produced surface temperatures hot enough to melt lead.
Asked what NASA's reaction has been to his recent bold statements, Dr. Hansen gave a nervous smile. ''They're still trying to make up their minds,'' he said.
His Bold Statement Transforms the Debate On Greenhouse Effect
By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
Published: August 23, 1988
unquote
Now AI is on...
Anyway...Hansen sounded the alarm there in 1988...that's...thirty years ago!...no wait..just twenty...whew!...
But there was another problem woken up to back then...ozone...brb...
quote
On January 23, 1978, Sweden became the first nation to ban CFC-containing aerosol sprays that are thought to damage the ozone layer. A few other countries, including the United States, Canada, and Norway, followed suit later that year, but the European Community rejected an analogous proposal. Even in the U.S., chlorofluorocarbons continued to be used in other applications, such as refrigeration and industrial cleaning, until after the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985. After negotiation of an international treaty (the Montreal Protocol), CFC production was sharply limited beginning in 1987 and phased out completely by 1996.
unquote
So...
quote
His best-known work is the discovery that chlorofluorocarbons contribute to ozone depletion. Rowland theorized that manmade organic compound gases combine with solar radiation and decompose in the stratosphere, releasing atoms of chlorine and chlorine monoxide that are individually able to destroy large numbers of ozone molecules. Rowland's research, first published in Nature magazine in 1974, initiated a scientific investigation of the problem. The National Academy of Sciences concurred with their findings in 1976, and in 1978 CFC-based aerosols were banned in the United States.
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I remember reading that Rowland thought he found how the world was to end...and soon.
quote
Effects of Nuclear Weapons on the Atmosphere
F. Sherwood Rowland, 1985
unquote
That's an interview...part of a series...
DavidDavid


Saturday, March 29, 2008

Caveman Gestures


Last night Man against Wild was on...didn't mention it!...it was just a couple bits...first bit Bear is sitting perched (Bear is the "man"!) up in the Amazon forest canopy...sm0ke from fire nearby..and a helicopter swoops in to pick him up (ten thousand dollars a ride hereabouts!)....and then in the very next bit he's hunting in the forest with some genuine stone age neolithic amazonia indians...and Bear's yakity yaking..then sees something....no one else of the hunters see!...and aims his arrow...and thump...shoots an iguana about eight inches long...at the moment of impact both his arms went up in celebration..well...sort of up...it was the kinda short arm lift Jack Nickalaus does after sinking a big putt...weak is what it looks like for gawds sake!...hardly a Tiger Woods fist pump..which looks in the mirror practiced!...anyway...in the hunt..lifting ones arms in celebration after one brings down the prey must be really really old...and I'm sure it's spontaneous...a Neolithic gesture for sure...and can be grim...thinking here of the Japanese atop the old wall of Nanking...brb


quote


Banzai"Banzai" literally means ten thousand years (of life).It is shouted in happy occasions while raising both arms. People shout "banzai" to express their happiness, to celebrate a victory, to hope for longevity and so on. It is commonly done together with the large group of people.
Foreign people seem to confuse "banzai" with a war cry. It is probably because the Japanese soldiers shouted "Tennouheika Banzai" when they were dying during World War II. In this context what they meant was "Long live the Emperor" or "Salute the Emperor".




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brb...


quote


"Banzai" (万歳, "Banzai"?), which became a Japanese battle cry during the war, is translated literally as "Ten thousand years" but more accurately as "Long Live". Suicide charges and human-wave attacks alike were called "banzai charges" by Allied troops due to the Japanese Army's practice of shouting "Tennōheika banzai !" (天皇陛下万歳!, "Tennōheika banzai !"?), meaning "Long live the emperor!", during such charges.[2]


unquote


Now...in the curent "over there"...the shout Allahu Akbar ("God is Great") seems to have become the new "banzai"....seems to be an odd thing to say when a roadside bomb goes off...


And I cant go anywhere with that...it's just Nanking grim....


The raised arms though remind me of something...brb...


this isn't quite it...but it's nearby...first this...


quote


18And the LORD said unto Joshua, Stretch out the spear that is in thy hand toward Ai; for I will give it into thine hand. And Joshua stretched out the spear that he had in his hand toward the city.
19And the ambush arose quickly out of their place, and they ran as soon as he had stretched out his hand: and they entered into the city, and took it, and hasted and set the city on fire.
20And when the men of Ai looked behind them, they saw, and, behold, the smoke of the city ascended up to heaven, and they had no power to flee this way or that way: and the people that fled to the wilderness turned back upon the pursuers.
21And when Joshua and all Israel saw that the ambush had taken the city, and that the smoke of the city ascended, then they turned again, and slew the men of Ai.
22And the other issued out of the city against them; so they were in the midst of Israel, some on this side, and some on that side: and they smote them, so that they let none of them remain or escape.
23And the king of Ai they took alive, and brought him to Joshua.
24And it came to pass, when Israel had made an end of slaying all the inhabitants of Ai in the field, in the wilderness wherein they chased them, and when they were all fallen on the edge of the sword, until they were consumed, that all the Israelites returned unto Ai, and smote it with the edge of the sword.
25And so it was, that all that fell that day, both of men and women, were twelve thousand, even all the men of Ai.
26For Joshua drew not his hand back, wherewith he stretched out the spear, until he had utterly destroyed all the inhabitants of Ai.
27Only the cattle and the spoil of that city Israel took for a prey unto themselves, according unto the word of the LORD which he commanded Joshua.
28And Joshua burnt Ai, and made it an heap for ever, even a desolation unto this day.
29And the king of Ai he hanged on a tree until eventide: and as soon as the sun was down, Joshua commanded that they should take his carcase down from the tree, and cast it at the entering of the gate of the city, and raise thereon a great heap of stones, that remaineth unto this day.


Joshua 8:18...


unquote


that's...really grim...brb...


quote


Noun
Singularorant
Pluralorants
orant (plural orants)
An image of a person with hands up in prayer.


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That's from Wiktionary...some offshoot of wiki!..neat..


I was thinking of this battle in the Bible where I thought Joshua has to keep his arms upraised...and when they get weary...he gets help...but the story is about Moses...brb....


quote


This scene draws upon Exodus 17:8–13, which recounts the ancient Jews’ battle against their enemy, Amalek, as they marched toward the Promised Land. To the left of Moses is his brother Aaron, the High Priest, and to the right is Hur, a military leader. These two men are holding up Moses’ arms. According to the Bible, as long as Moses held up his arms, the Hebrews would win the battle against the Amalekites. If Moses were to lower his arms, the Israelites would lose.




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Page has a pic...


Exodus 17:8–13Amalek came and fought with Israel at Rephidim. Moses said to Joshua, "Pick some men for us, and go out and do battle with Amalek. Tomorrow I will station myself on the top of the hill, with the rod of God in my hand." Joshua did as Moses told him and fought with Amalek, while Moses, Aaron, and Hur went up to the top of the hill. Then, whenever Moses held up his hand, Israel prevailed; but whenever he let down his hand, Amalek prevailed. But Moses' hands grew heavy; so they took a stone and put it under him and he sat on it, while Aaron and Hur, one on each side, supported his hands; thus, his hands remained steady until the sun set. And Joshua overwhelmed the people of Amalek with the sword.




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well...Joshua was there too....that "steady hand" bit reminds me of something...brb...


The myth tells the life story of Llew Llaw Gyffes, whose name is translated by Robert Graves “the Lion with the Steady Hand” and by others as “Lugh (the Sun god) with the Long Arm.”


that's the bit I'm reminded of...but for another sometime!...but this business of Moses holding up his arms as a kinda a charm has lodged in my head for a long time!...something else comes to mind.... The Gundestrup Cauldron...the Lord of the Animals panel I was thinking of...worth a thought!...but back to Moses and the arms...brb...




That's a page with Dogon sculptures with arms raised..."arms raised primitive art" search is bringing things up...I'm getting drawin into this!...I hadn't thought it so involved...there's alot of writing on this...


I'll close with the thought of "touchdown!"..and "three point shot is up...and in!"


DavidDavid






Friday, March 28, 2008

Armegedggon Wars


Mamas and Papas story on PBS..now Huel with Monterrey Cypress..


I cant think this thought through..but I was thinking World War One and Two were Armageddon Wars...what I'm thinking of is how the Book of Revelations says after a big war a new Millennia will come...a new world...born Phoenix like...brb...


quote


The phoenix is also a prominent symbol on the flag and seal of the City and County of San Francisco, symbolizing the city rising from the ashes of the devastation caused by the 1906 earthquake.




unquote


That's the notion I was thinking of...that a war is a kinda fire like the Phoenix goes through...and the aftermath a rebirth...brb...


quote


A phoenix is a mythical bird with beautiful gold and red plumage. At the end of its life-cycle the phoenix builds itself a nest of cinnamon twigs that it then ignites; both nest and bird burn fiercely and are reduced to ashes, from which a new, young phoenix arises.


unquote


brb


quote


PUBLISHER'S NOTE
The physical publication of this book is unique in that it has 2 covers - the first, carries a picture of Jerusalem’s Holy Mount under fiery atomic explosion and burning.
The 2nd Cover, two pages further, displays peaceful blue skies, with a glittering white City - the New Jerusalem, built on the ashes of the first, and the title, in gold letters:
THE PHOENIX WILL RISE FROM THE ASHES . . . Jerusalem - nucleus of a New World Order




unquote


Well...that's an example of what's out there....but in truth it's been out there since the Book of Revelations was written..and the Old Testament has apocalyptic thinking in it too...with the same a phoenix like new order will rise from the ashes...


brb...


quote


So were there religious terrors and overwrought expectations of the Final Judgment in the year 999? Absolutely. And also in the years 899, 1199, 1299 -- you name it. One might as well turn the question around and ask, ''How could it have been otherwise?''
In the period before the millennium, Christian outposts in Europe were struggling against wave after wave of invaders, among them Muslim Saracens and pagan Vikings and Magyars. In addition, there was the usual run of famines and epidemics.


Beliefs; Millennial fears in the year 1000: apocalypse then, apocalypse now and apocalypse forever.

By PETER STEINFELS
Published: July 17, 1999



unquote


Well..that's close to what I was thinking!...in fact I recall reading articles like that in 1999...


And Huel is taken with the Old Serra Oak...me too!...


anyway...that bit where the Phoenix makes it's own nest I find troubling...


DavidDavid

Thursday, March 27, 2008

Mating Calls


quote


You cant just switch the rules up because you don’t like the way things might work out!


Charles Barkley


unquote


I'll have to start recording the Thursday postgame wisdom of Sir Charles!


Golden State Warriors have a cool team...


On listening to the Spring calls of the birds..and other critters too...I got to wondering if people...way way back...had set calls for things...like mating and danger...well clearly screaming for danger...dont even like to think about people screaming....but singing...the marvelous voices we have must have given voice to some kind of mating song...brb...


quote


At once a pioneering study of evolution and an accessible and lively read, The Mating Mind offers the most convincing—radical—explanation to date for how and why the human mind evolved. Traditionally, evolutionary theory has explained intelligence as merely a byproduct of surplus brain size. But psychologist Geoffrey Miller argues that it actively evolved, like a peacock’s tail, for courtship and mating, and thereby shaped human nature.




on Amazon


The Mating Mind: How Sexual Choice Shaped the Evolution of Human Nature (Paperback)by Geoffrey Miller


unquote


ah..another book I coulda wrote!!...but I'm looking for that mating call...well...the Leopard call in Bringing up Baby came to mind...here's trailer on YouTube...




brb...


Here's a site...really neat!...that has downloadable ringtone mating calls of different critters...




but no Leopard...brb...


quote


AHMEDABAD, India - Forest guards in western India are using cell phones with ringtones of cows mooing, goats bleating and roosters crowing to attract leopards that have wandered into human settlements, officials said on Monday.




unquote


Well...when I added "ringtone" to the search all manner of animal sounds come up...for luring... a good and a bad thing!...the mating call of the Leopard in Bringing Up Baby would make a great ringtone...and it's probably out there somewhere...this site has royalty free music...I think..


Oh...and this in the web news tonight!
quote
"It's magic," audio historian David Giovannoni said on Thursday. "It's like a ghost singing to you."
Lasting 10 seconds, the recording is of a person singing "Au clair de la lune, Pierrot repondit" ("By the light of the moon, Pierrot replied") — part of a French song, according to First Sounds, a group of audio historians, recording engineers, sound archivists and others dedicated to preserving humankind's earliest sound recordings.
unquote
Oh!...and here's is the recording at NY Times site...above was Reuters...very cool..
Apples' thinnest book commercial on..and a catchy tune!
New Soul by Yael Naim
I think she's French...
DavidDavid


Wednesday, March 26, 2008

Thylacoleo


Discovery Kids on with animated cavemen and dinosaurs...there's gotta be a lot of work to making those films!


Thought about today the hole in the Australian outback that has been swallowing animals for thousands and thousands of years...kindof the same trap thing as the La Brea Tar pits...brb...


quote


In 2002, a remarkably complete skeleton of T. carnifex was discovered in a limestone cave under Nullarbor Plain, where the animal fell to its death through a narrow opening in the plain above.[5]






unquote


The show brought up the possibility that ancient people burned grasslands and changed the ecosystems in such a way that the 'mega fauna' went extinct...this along with hunting too...


Everyone is kinda desperate to find an idea of why these animals went extinct in that ten thousand years ago window!...


Bats were on Charlie Rose last nite...they're in trouble like the Bees it seems...I haven't been bit by a mosquito yet...dont know when they're supposed to show up..brb..still dont...but got the name...Culex Tarsalis....
Well...I recalled my Mormon friend's tale of a hole in the ground in Mexico from which hellish sounds emerged...thought to find it with a search...but it's kinda scary!...and "underground" again I thought to look up something I skipped: "secret underground cities"...which promptly froze up the browser page!...but I'll go off awhile on that!...and post this...
DavidDavid


Tuesday, March 25, 2008

The Crater of the Ant


It's Robert Frost's birthday tomorrow...Happy Birthday Robert Frost!...brb...

quote

Frost was the first American who could be honestly reckoned a master-poet by world standards. [Edgar Allan] Poe, Long-fellow, Whittier, and many more of his American predecessors had written good provincial verse; and Whitman, a homespun eccentric, had fallen short of the master-poet title only through failing to realize how much more was required of him. Frost has won the title fairly, not by turning his back on ancient European tradition, nor by imitating its successes, but by developing it in a way that at last matches the American climate and the American language. (p. ix)

Frost, Robert (Lee) 1874–1963: Critical Essay by Robert Graves

http://www.bookrags.com/criticism/frost-robert-lee-18741963_9/


The Vantage Point

If tired of trees I seek again mankind,
Well I know where to hie me—in the dawn,
To a slope where the cattle keep the lawn,
There amid lolling juniper reclined,
Myself unseen, I see in white defined
Far off the homes of men, and farther still,
The graves of men on an opposing hill,
Living or dead, whichever are to mind.

And if by noon I have too much of these,
I have but to turn on my arm, and lo,
The sunburned hillside sets my face aglow,
My breathing shakes the bluet like a breeze,
I smell the earth, I smell the bruisèd plant,
I look into the crater of the ant.

Robert Frost


unquote

DavidDavid

Monday, March 24, 2008

Future Ages


Arthur C. Clarke died...aged ninety...I was reminded of 2001...I had read all his science fiction books as a kid....Childhood's End was the story the movie was based on...it had a different ending than the movie...brb...
Frontline is on...with the story of Powell's UN speech...and the ramp to Iraq....and this..."future ages" speech on MSN...
quote
WASHINGTON - President Bush pledged Monday to ensure “an outcome that will merit the sacrifice” of those who have died in Iraq, offering both sympathy and resolve as the U.S. death toll in the five-year war hit 4,000.
“One day, people will look back at this moment in history and say, ‘Thank God there were courageous people willing to serve because they laid the foundation for peace for generations to come,’ “ Bush said at the State Department after a two-hour briefing on U.S. diplomatic strategy around the world. “I vow so long as I am president to make sure that those lives were not lost in vain.”
ap
unquote
Future Ages I was thinking of was the dreams of the science fiction writers!...back to Arthur's story...brb...Pournelle's page has a little obit...brb...
well...wiki has it that Clarke was irreligious...though I think scientific evolution probably was his religion!....and here's an interesting quote from wiki's page...nice thing about wiki's pages is that they are updated...kindalike that "library"...kinda like Clarke's prediction of a world wide library!...
quote
This idea of transcendence through evolution seems to have been influenced by Olaf Stapledon, who wrote a number of books dealing with this theme. Clarke has said of Stapledon's 1930 book Last and First Men that "No other book had a greater influence on my life ... [It] and its successor Star Maker (1937) are the twin summits of [Stapledon's] literary career".[49]
unquote
institute of forest genetics...and apollo 14...Huel is on!...
but let me go see that last and first men...brb
quote
Last and First Men: A Story of the Near and Far Future is a science fiction novel written in 1930 by the British author Olaf Stapledon. A work of unprecedented scale in the genre, it describes the history of humanity from the present onwards across two billion years and eighteen distinct human species, of which our own is the first and most primitive.
unquote
That tree place will have how that flower was in the log!...have to go there sometime...it's nearby...Placerville...
Well...Olaf is grim...and all about "men" evolving...maybe daffodils will grow legs...and push us aside!
Surely the most remarkable thing about Nature is that there are so many species...each has the potential to evolve and push aside...Koala needn't just eat Eucalyptus leaves...or Pandas bamboo...or Cows grasses...and there are carniverous plants...wasn't that The Day of the Traffids!?...brb...
quote
Triffids are plants capable of animal-like behaviour: they feed on rotting meat, are able to uproot themselves and move about on their three "legs", possess a deadly whip-like poisonous sting, and appear to communicate with each other
unquote
or The Little Shop of Horrors...brb..
quote
Little Shop of Horrors is a musical by composer Alan Menken and writer Howard Ashman, about a nerdy florist shop worker who raises a plant that feeds on human blood
unquote
apollo 14 moon trees...brb...
quote
Moon trees are trees grown from hundreds of seeds taken into orbit around the moon by Stuart Roosa during the Apollo 14 mission in 1971. They were used as a way to help connect the American public with the endeavours of their astronauts.
unquote
lost in time..fallen throught the cracks....there's no record?..secret trees...to protect them...Huel's right...wiki needs to be updated!!
A butterfly landed on my tripod...the black foam sleeves attracted it...and another landed on the head...and then another landed on my shirt sleeve!...I had been desperately trying to take pictures of them...but around noon they fly about mostly...morning and evening are good times as the sit still then!...so I was taken with Butterflies today..this at Hite Cove with friend...the Daffodil was planted there by homes at the road...and on the way back...well...it was like the opening of Men in Black when the Dragonfly goes smack against the windshield...and...I was reminded of the insignifigant end of Earth...hardly an apocolypte grand finale!....in the Hithhiker's Guide to the Galaxy...brb..
quote
According to the series, far back in prehistory, when the first primeval Vogons crawled out of the sea, the forces of evolution were so disgusted with them that they never allowed them to evolve again
unquote
The Earth of course was in the path of an interstellar roadway...and the Vogon's 'road building equipment' brb...
quote
Vogon poetry is of course, the third worst in the universe. The second worst is that of the Azgoths of Kria. During a recitation by their poet master Grunthos the Flatulent of his poem "Ode to a Small Lump of Green Putty I Found in My Armpit One Midsummer Morning" four of his audience died of internal haemorrhaging and the president of the Mid-Galactic Arts Nobbling Council survived by gnawing one of his own legs off.
unquote
Charlie Rose has a black eye!...brb...
quote
Rose had a choice to make when he tripped on a 59th street pothole in New York City: protect his newly purchased MacBook Air, or his face — he chose the former. According to his producers, "The Macbook Air is fine, he showed us the blood stains on it this morning."
unquote
Peter Otoole on now with the story of his Tin Hip...and now Charlie's tale of trip..and a lament that it all was no more grand than...smacked into a windshield I'd say!...Otoole says he's a retired Christain...some people admire their visage in a mirror...Otoole listens to tapes...
a visit to the Restaurant at the End...brb...
oh..wait...Otoole's talking about Lawrence of Arabia...imposing a western culture on an ancient people in the middle east is the road to folly...Otoole quoting T.E.Lawrence...
Lawrence was a good friend of Robert Graves...which is how I came first to reading that tale...
but the Restaurant...
quote
Douglas Adams
The Restaurant at the End of the Universe
There is a theory which states that if ever anyone discovers exactly what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable.
There is another theory which states that this has already happened.
Chapter 1
The story so far:
In the beginning the Universe was created.
This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.
Many races believe that it was created by some sort of God, though the Jatravartid people of Viltvodle VI believe that the entire Universe was in fact sneezed out of the nose of a being called the Great Green Arkleseizure.
unquote
Have you written things for posterity?....Rose.
Statues of snow...Otoole.
Butterflies on the radiator grill, I'd say!...DavidDavid
search: "I wandered lonely as a cloud" on Youtube...and be sure to wear restraints to prevent self mutilation!

Sunday, March 23, 2008

Stealing Thunder


Geronimo is on....I saw this once and didn't much like it...


Lemego see if I can find a meaning for "stealing someone's thunder"...


quote

The story that lies behind 'stealing someone's thunder' is that of the literary critic and largely unsuccessful playwright, John Dennis. In 1704, Dennis's play Appius and Virginia was produced at the Drury Lane Theatre, London and he invented a new method of creating the sound of thunder for the production. We don't know now what this method was (some texts say it was a refinement of the mustard bowl referred to by Pope, in which metal balls were rolled around in a wooden bowl), but it is reported that after Appius and Virginia failed and was closed, the method was soon afterwards used in a production of Macbeth. Dennis was less than pleased at having his idea purloined and this account of his response was recorded by the literary scholar Joseph Spence (1699–1768) and later quoted in W. S. Walsh's Literary Curiosities, 1893:
"Damn them! They will not let my play run, but they steal my thunder."




unquote


Well, I've gone and snagged the meaning...and...stolen a bit of thunder too!


quote


"Plagiarism is the basis of all culture." Seeger quoting his father.


unquote


That's Pete Seeger...


But today on thinking on this I was thinking about something the ancients did when involved with conflicts...wars...they would try to steal one another gods...it has a name...starts with an e...and this is going to take some doing to find it again!...brb...found it...




it's a thread about elicio...brb...


quote


In ancient times it was believed that names had power. The names of gods were always hidden. The Romans had a practice called "elicio", in which they sought to learn the names of enemy gods and cajole those deities into siding with Rome. (For more on this, see my column "Elicio et Vinca".)




unquote


from another thread...lemesee if I can find the column!...haven't yet found an explanation that sings...well..I'd had it...it's at the top of an elicio search...


quote


The Romans followed a practice reminiscent of this. It was called elicio. Roman priests cajoled the enemy's deities, offering temples and sacrifices if they would abandon their people and side with Rome. The Romans kept their word. Temples were built and maintained at public expense. The Campus Martius, in particular, was strewn with deities like toys litter a spoiled kid's room.




unquote


go see what the Campus is...oh...it's called the Field of Mars...and wikis has it's history...




brb...Robert Graves quotes and uses the following...in the context of how one religion supplants another...I didn't know it was a quote!...thought it was his line...but that's why I like Graves...he is like link central to all manner of things!...


quote


Conquering kings their titles take,from the foes they captive make;

Jesus, by a nobler deed,from the thousands he hath freed.

- Nevers Breviary, 1727, trans. John Chandler, 1837


unquote


this blog snagged that quote!




lemego get Nevers Breviary!...


occasionally glancing at Geromimo...and it's silly take on Indian Neolithicness!


But actually the film is going over an "elicio' circumstance the Romans would appreciate...


but the Breviary...makes me think of av iary!...brb


It's loud...and it's a hymn!




Well...here's "Nevers"




and Breviary...


quote


The canonical hours of the Breviary owe their remote origin to the Old Covenant when God commanded the Aaronic priests to offer morning and evening sacrifices. Other inspiration may have come from David's words in the Psalms "Seven times a day I praise you" (Ps. 119:164), as well as, "the just man meditates on the law day and night" (Ps. 1:2).




unquote


Old Covenant...brb...well...there all manner of web pages putting the Old Convenant side by side with the New Convenant!...


Seems Christians, Moslems, Mormons, et al, went about some thunder stealing!


quote


Have you an arm like God? or can you thunder with a voice like him?


Job


unquote


and the context...the whole passage...has this!...


quote


15 “Behold now, Behemoth, which I made as well as you; He eats grass like an ox. 16 “Behold now, his strength in his loins And his power in the muscles of his belly. 17 “He bends his tail like a cedar; The sinews of his thighs are knit together. 18 “His bones are tubes of bronze; His limbs are like bars of iron. 19 “He is the first of the ways of God; Let his maker bring near his sword. 20 “Surely the mountains bring him food, And all the beasts of the field play there. 21 “Under the lotus plants he lies down, In the covert of the reeds and the marsh. 22 “The lotus plants cover him with shade; The willows of the brook surround him. 23 “If a river rages, he is not alarmed; He is confident, though the Jordan rushes to his mouth. 24 “Can anyone capture him when he is on watch, With barbs can anyone pierce his nose?


unquote


and from wiki


quote


There is a legend that the Leviathan and the Behemoth shall hold a battle at the end of the world. The two will finally kill each other, and the surviving men will feast on their meat. According to midrash recording traditions, it is impossible for anyone to kill a behemoth except for the person who created it, in this case the God of the Hebrews. A later Jewish haggadic tradition furthermore holds that at the banquet at the end of the world, the behemoth will be served up along with the Leviathan and Ziz.
Behemoth also appears in the Apocryphal Book of Enoch, giving the following description of this monster's origins there mentioned as being male, as opposed to the female Leviathan:
"And that day will two monsters be parted, one monster, a female named Leviathan in order to dwell in the abyss of the ocean over the fountains of water; and (the other), a male called Behemoth, which holds his chest in an invisible desert whose name is Dundayin, east of the garden of Eden." - 1 Enoch 60:7-8


unquote


oh...gotta look up Dundayin!


quote


The Bible and Science:Are Dinosaurs Mentioned in the Bible?




unquote


A banquet at the end of the world?...perhaps at the restauant at the end of the universe...
I will come back to some of this when I do up the post on the film Eye of the Tiger with Jane Seymore...the Leviathan Behemoth battle!...
Oh...I wont sleep if I dont look up Ziz...brb...
quote
The ziz (Hebrew: זיז) is a giant bird in Jewish mythology, said to be large enough to be able to block out the sun with its wingspan
unquote
Well...zzzzzzzzz wont be the same!
quote
Some say that the ziz was created to protect all of the birds and that if the ziz did not exist, then all the smaller birds on Earth would be helpless and killed.The Ziz is also an immortal creature that terrified the people that entered its territory and those who killed birds.[
unquote
and this...what's in a name?
Geronimo (Chiricahua: Goyaałé, "one who yawns"; often spelled Goyathlay or Goyahkla[1] in English) (June 16, 1829February 17, 1909) was a prominent Native American leader of the Chiricahua Apache who defended his people against the encroachment of the United States on their tribal lands for over 25 years.
DavidDavid

Saturday, March 22, 2008

Flower of Life







On a morning photog walk with a friend, they pointed out this flower pattern on a sawn log...I've never seen anything like this!...on a sawn log I mean...and it's six fold symmetry...plants are usually five...this was Thursday and I had just seen something like this searching out the Osirion at Abydos in Egypt...seems there is Greek graffitti on the lintels...and the graffitti is the image of something known as the "Flower of Life"...brb...here's link to Osirion story...which I think I linked before!




They're digging around for King Solomon's palace...the stables at Maggido...of the Armegeddon tale!...


gosh!...this Flower of Life drawing has been gone over by everyone...I could spend the rest of the night exploring wiki's links...




Somewhere in all this is should be the Flower done with solid three dimensional spheres...I got to playing around with my billiards balls...I had my own set to play with in on the rec pool table!...and they can be made to form up like the Flower...but since Solomon is on...lemegothere!...brb...


but a step back!


quote


Fruit of Life
The "Fruit of Life" symbol is composed of 13 circles taken from the design of the Flower of Life.[2][35]
The Fruit of Life is said to be the blueprint of the universe, containing the basis for the design of every atom, molecular structure, life form, and everything in existence.[2][25] It contains the geometric basis for the delineation of Metatron's Cube, which brings forth the platonic solids.


unquote


The game of pool has thirteen balls...twelve and the cue!...when I was horsing around with them I had in mind the pyramidions on the Pyramids...and gold...and well...they say atoms are like little balls...so I was just seeing what kinda a geometries the balls could make!...but to Solomon...and his seal...brb..


but wait again...


quote


The akashic records (akasha is a Sanskrit word meaning "sky", "space" or "aether") is a term from Hinduism that was incorporated into theosophy denoting a collection of mystical knowledge encoded in a non-physical plane of existence. The records are supposed to contain all knowledge, including all human experience, of the history of the cosmos. The akashic records are metaphorically described as a library and are also likened to a universal computer or the 'Mind of God'. The records are supposed to be constantly updated and it is claimed that they can be accessed through astral projection. The concept originated in the theosophical movements of the 19th Century, and remains prevalent in New Age discourse.


unquote


but onward...


quote


In Medieval Jewish, Christian and Islamic legends, the Seal of Solomon was a magical signet ring said to have been possessed by King Solomon, which variously gave him the power to command demons (or jinni), or to speak with animals.




unquote


The pentagram has long been associated with the planet Venus, and the worship of the goddess Venus, or her equivalent. It is also associated with the Roman word lucifer, which was a term used for Venus as the Morning Star, associated with the bringer of light and knowledge. It is most likely to have originated from the observations of prehistoric astronomers.[3] When viewed from Earth, successive inferior conjunctions of Venus plot a nearly perfect pentagram shape around the zodiac every eight years.[4]




unquote


The Seal is the Star of David..but sometimes..I guess the pentagram too...which is what I had it as...that Venus bit a curio!!


quote


The Greek Classical Elements (Earth, Water, Air, Fire, and sometimes also "Idea") date from pre-Socratic times and persisted throughout the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance, deeply influencing European thought and culture. The Hindu and Japanese also had essentially the same five elements: the four states-of-matter, plus a fifth element to describe that which was beyond the material world (non-matter). The concept was widely disseminated in India and China, where it forms the basis of both Buddhism and Hinduism, particularly in an esoteric context.


unquote


'and "idea"' ...well...that's something...a fifth element...brb...well...I started looking at what the Old Chinese did with these things!..and it is way too much!...


I think I'll just make that log one of my stops on the walkabouts...and have a seat!


But what I see is that flowers, plants in general have five fold, and less commonly six fold, symmetry...so five fold I consider the symmetry of life...flowers..six fold of water...snowflakes...I'm taken by the Dogwoods here...the bract flowers have six fold...


quote



"but whoever drinks of the water that I shall give him will never thirst. But the water that I shall give him will become in him a fountain of water springing up into everlasting life."
John 4:14

a bit from the search...




brb...here's a site with tiny print!


ancient ceremonies!...free masonrey on now on Nat Geo...the lure..allure..is the secrecy...
The Escher pic is from looking up hyperbolic geometry...which I cant follow at all!...
I'm just looking for that pine's six petaled flower pattern...it almost looked like marque work...
a youTube bit!
Well..I suppose loggers see this patterm often...cant say that I've ever seen it before, on a stump or log or any pine...but it says to me that the pine has a six fold symmetry...I'll look again...sometime!
DavidDavid



Friday, March 21, 2008

Lost Age, Lost Senses

Here's a blog site that fills out the book cover...

http://www.wildyorkshire.co.uk/naturediary/docs/2005/7/4.html

Carpenter's The Thing was on...now another spooker...

Reading about the Paleolithic and the Neolithic one gets the impression that these Ages are gone...only to be discovered in caveman graves...not so...living American Indians have still many of the ceremonies and rituals, the other "code"...and they were, are, Neolithic peoples...I suppose there are even still undiscovered Neoliths out in New Guinea....

And these are the ages that the old Greek's called Golden....and surley the way people live has changed...and so can be categorized for different times...but the animals haven't...they're still in the 'golden' age...which is what the world is...basically...Life on Earth has little regard for Man's Ages...

So the Neolithic isn't a lost age...it's actually right outside Tree in the Door...somewhat marred by building noise and such...but it's a real stone age setting.

But what is lost is the senses people had when hunter gatherers...and early farming...the Navajos with maize and peaches and such.

Which brings me to something I wanted to look up I heard on a show...oh I cant recall...think it was talk show...Charlie Rose interview..of....if it comes back...but what was said was that John Philip Sousa said the invention of records would end people singing. People used to sing all the time...at home, at work...but with recorded music...they would just sit and listen...brb...well, I could maybe find it...it was a lament by Sousa...that a new technology was going to make one kind of music...real singing...go extinct...

Technology is doing that all the time...people dont walk anymore..they ride in cars...and too the cars and lay out of cities makes it only possible to walk anywhere only on the shoulders of public roads...

Robert Graves has a lot of these laments in the White Goddess...lemesee if I can get the 'circus tent' bit...brb...

quote

"Nowadays" is a civilization in which the prime emblems of poetry are dishonoured. In which serpent, lion, and eagle belong to the circus-tent; ox, salmon and boar to the cannery, racehorse and greyhound to the betting ring; and the sacred grove to the saw-mill. In which the Moon is despised as a burned-out satellite of the Earth and woman reckoned as "auxiliary State personnel." In which money will buy almost anything but truth, and almost anyone but the truth-possessed poet.

unquote

I picked up the White Goddess, seeing on the jacket, or somewhere inside, a bit about the Battle of the Trees...and I though it an enviornmental story of some sort...like loggers vs. tree huggers...well indeed it is...but the Battle of the Trees is another thing too....an old poem made of enchanting riddles...that enchanted Graves...and his readers...

here's a bit I did using the kinda way englyn's go...

a poem:

Counting Campsites instead of Hoofed Locusts

May Lake,
Where I usually stay,
Near the fallen tree root where the marmots play.

Tuolumne,
With my sister and niece,
For my sister’s birthday:
Cots, and a wood stove quick to heat.

Ireland Lake,
Open tundra like spring flower land:
Midnight and lightning storm passing
Wind on the tent fabric like an electric scratching hand.

Lower Young Lake,
On the open soft sand, a sunny bower:
Thunder and lightning, Ragged Peak and Mt. Conness glower.

Nelson Lake,
Teetering on Elizabeth’s snow cornice pass, and beyond:
Footsteps to a deer belong? A solo night sound….

Sardine Lake,
Down Bloody Canyon (red red in the morning sun’s line):
A tree with a face, frightening!
As the nite black wind haunting.

Volgelsang,
In the white tent a lemonade stand,
And where I lay on the lakeshore’s grass
The mountain flowers to ogle.

Sunnyside,
Indeed, across the meadow the morning sun will glare
Abrupt as some fool with a trumpet at the hillside community blare.

Tree in the Door, in between,
Nighttime paddles to the can, and Yosemite Fall’s roar:
Twelve cabin neighbors, and more—they all snore.

Upper Young Lake,
To Conness in the morning:
Full moon’s reflected rise peeking over the lake’s wall…..a coyote singing….

Tuolumne Walk In,
At the store’s grill, break fast and lunch,
At the bus stop picnic tables, tales,
Everyone arriving and going, their packs hunch…

ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ





quote





My thesis is that the language of poetic myth anciently current in the Mediterranean and Northern Europe was a magical language bound up with popular religious ceremonies in honour of the Moon-goddess, or Muse, some of them dating from the Old Stone Age, and that this remains the language of true poetry... [p. x]





Robert Graves, The White Goddess





unquote

DolphinWords
DavidDavid
Yosemite
Feb. 28, 2007

DavidDavid

Thursday, March 20, 2008

Flower Wars


Well....war is the great alter of human sacrifice..it would seem...and is often recalled and celebrated..if that's possible...with ceremonies and rituals...lemesee if I can say something straight...


The genetic code remembers and passes things on from generation to generation...and there's another kindof "code"....cultural... which is passed on with ceremonies and rituals...even the animals have rituals and ceremonies...all kinds of mating behaviors....and ways of doing things...and the cultural code is very hard to imagine and pin down...some of it is surely genetic...but some of it too seems to be kindof artistic...just made up and passed along...anyway there are these two codes always at work...and now I'm going to see if I can get some help for this!...brb...


quote


Lets remember that, until relatively recently, the vast majority of humans were farmers who did not receive any significant benefit from civilization, which was the prerogative of a tiny elite (the governing and priestly classes, city dwellers in general). In fact, that elite ruthlessly exploited farmers for its own benefit. They were what historian William H. McNeill calls macroparasites in his book Plagues and Peoples.






unquote


well...that wasn't quite what I had in mind..but is so interesting I thought to quote it!...and it's a blog...brb...


quote


There seems little reason to mince words or pull punches about man's aggressive instincts. In prehistoric times man was a hunter and a killer of other men. The killer instinct in the prehistoric male is clearly attested by archaeology in fortifications, weapons, cave paintings, and skeletal remains. Whether these "instincts" are biologically or culturally induced remains a matter of controversy, but by the end of prehistoric times man was a fighter, capable of waging organized warfare of the sort seen in later historical societies.


NEOLITHIC WARFAREArther Ferrill




Well...what is it?...biological (genetic) or cultural...???...what I would like to latch on to here is the ceremonies and rituals caveman used...and set them side by side with the history of war ceremonies...I mean...just consider "war paint" of the Indians....who are a Neolithic people...


And that's something I keep coming back to!...the Neolithic was very much alive in many parts of the world in the nineteenth century...where it could be observed by minds honed by the scientific revolution...all across America were Neolithic peoples...the Indians...and as the colonists moved west..and moved forward with the inventions of technology too!...they had encounters, and could make observations, of the Indians...lemego look up "war paint"...brb...
There was much ritual and ceremony in American Indian warfare...brb...
well...this is something!...there is an actual path...
quote
The Great Indian Warpath (GIW) — also known as the Great Indian War and Trading Path, or the Seneca Trail — was that part of the network of trails in eastern North America developed and used by Native Americans which ran through the Great Appalachian Valley . The system of footpaths (the Warpath branched off in several places onto alternate routes and over time shifted westward in some regions) extended from what is now upper New York state to deep within Georgia. Various Indians traded and made war along the trails, including the Catawba, numerous Algonquian tribes, the Cherokee, and the Iroquois Confederacy. The British traders' name for the route was derived from combining its name among the northeastern Algonquin tribes, "Mishimayagat" or "Great Trail", with that of the Shawnee and Delaware, "Athawominee" or "Path where they go armed".
unquote
Is it good make up, or just good genes? introducing Lauren Hutton's face disc!...sheesh...informercial on...
but to the war path...brb...
quote
A reason that the pacification of the redwood tribes took so long lay in the natural obstacles of the terrain. High mountains, deep streams, thick undergrowth all explained why "It should be so difficult a matter to bring to justice a few score of savages," noted the district commander in 1864, "rendering the rapid and certain movements of troops a matter of difficulty and affording innumerable hiding places to the enemy."

California Military History
California and The Indian Wars

War in the Redwoods
unquote
What a remarkable page!...and would seem to give the account of the last stand of the Neolithic warriors in Central North America...the US of A.
but before I curl up..sleep...lemeget the Flower Wars...
quote
The exact nature of the Flower Wars is not well determined but a number of different interpretations of the concept exist. The widely accepted[weasel words] idea of the Flower Wars is that it was a special institutionalized kind of warfare where two enemy states would plan battles through mutual arrangement in order to satisfy the religious needs of both combatants for war captives to use in sacrificial rituals, but also, possibly, to train young warriors and enable social mobility which for the lower classes was primarily possible through military service. This view is based on a number of quotes from early chroniclers and also from the letters of Cortés. However in recent years this interpretation has been doubted by scholars such as Nigel Davies[2] and Ross Hassig,[3] who argues that "the mutual arrangement" of the flower war institution is dubious, and suggest that Flowery War was in fact a low-intensity, sustained conflict with the Aztec side trying to fatigue the Tlaxcalteca in order to later conquer them entirely.
unquote
quote


Plains warriors loved ornaments. They decked themselves with trophies of war and the hunt. Locks of hair from the scalp of an enemy and soft white ermine tails dangled from the seams of the ceremonial shirt. Grizzly-bear claws and buffalo teeth were strung on otter skin for necklaces. Quivers, tobacco pouches, and medicine bags were made from pelts of panthers, otter, …




unquote


There was some of this on the Viking Warriors show last night...a question was being pursued...why were the Vikings so formidable?...and a thought was, judging from the elaborate war things they had...each sword with it's own name...belts decorated with magic amulets and such...in short, their concern with how they looked...indicated they were really "in" to being warriors...and that spirit can...and indeed does...carry the day in a battle.


Oh, I got my quotes out of order!...but they still work okay...
Pic is another by Curtis and from same site I used for the Indian burial pic...I think...
DavidDavid
Tree in the Door