Tuesday, March 25, 2008

The Crater of the Ant


It's Robert Frost's birthday tomorrow...Happy Birthday Robert Frost!...brb...

quote

Frost was the first American who could be honestly reckoned a master-poet by world standards. [Edgar Allan] Poe, Long-fellow, Whittier, and many more of his American predecessors had written good provincial verse; and Whitman, a homespun eccentric, had fallen short of the master-poet title only through failing to realize how much more was required of him. Frost has won the title fairly, not by turning his back on ancient European tradition, nor by imitating its successes, but by developing it in a way that at last matches the American climate and the American language. (p. ix)

Frost, Robert (Lee) 1874–1963: Critical Essay by Robert Graves

http://www.bookrags.com/criticism/frost-robert-lee-18741963_9/


The Vantage Point

If tired of trees I seek again mankind,
Well I know where to hie me—in the dawn,
To a slope where the cattle keep the lawn,
There amid lolling juniper reclined,
Myself unseen, I see in white defined
Far off the homes of men, and farther still,
The graves of men on an opposing hill,
Living or dead, whichever are to mind.

And if by noon I have too much of these,
I have but to turn on my arm, and lo,
The sunburned hillside sets my face aglow,
My breathing shakes the bluet like a breeze,
I smell the earth, I smell the bruis├Ęd plant,
I look into the crater of the ant.

Robert Frost


unquote

DavidDavid

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